Your Gallbladder

493ss_getty_rf_gallbladder_anatomy_illustrationYour gallbladder sits on the right side of your belly, below your liver. It’s a small organ, shaped like a pear, that holds a fluid called bile. This liquid, made in your liver, helps you digest fats and certain vitamins. When you eat, your body gets the signal to release it — through channels called ducts — into your small intestine.
The most common reason people have trouble with their gallbladder is gallstones. You get them when bile clumps together and forms solid masses. They can be as big as a golf ball, and you can have just one or several.

If a gallstone gets into a duct and keeps bile from flowing out, your gallbladder can get inflamed. That’s called cholecystitis, and it can lead to nausea, vomiting, and belly pain. Bacteria also can cause it. You can tell you’re having gallbladder trouble by where it hurts: the upper right part of your belly. It might get worse when you take deep breath, .and you may also feel an ache in your back or right shoulder blade.

If You Think You Have a Problem

Your doctor will examine you and might want to take a sample of your blood to look for signs your body is fighting an infection. You probably will have an imaging test, like an ultrasound. It uses sound waves to make detailed images of your gallbladder. Your doctor also might want an X-ray of your belly or other blood tests to see how well your liver is working. Your doctor may recommend surgery, called cholecystectomy, to take out your gallbladder. You’ll be fine without it — the bile your liver makes will flow straight into your intestine.

 

From Web MD

 

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