Author: vegasrobotdoc

Do You Have Nighttime ACID REFLUX Symptoms?

 

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Nighttime heartburn may be particularly dangerous. Waking up with a sour taste in the mouth, coughing, or sore throat may indicate nighttime acid reflux. Not only does it disturb sleep, but the esophagus may sustain more damage. That’s because when you are lying down for several hours, acid has a lot of time to linger in the esophagus and damage the tissue. When we are awake, we swallow saliva throughout the day. Saliva helps neutralize stomach acid. We naturally swallow less saliva when we sleep, so stomach acid is not neutralized.

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Gastroesophageal reflux disease: GERD,

downloadGastroesophageal reflux disease, or GERD, is a digestive disorder that affects the lower esophageal sphincter (LES), the ring of muscle between the esophagus and stomach. Many people, including pregnant women, suffer from heartburn or acid indigestion caused by GERD. Doctors believe that some people suffer from GERD due to a condition called hiatal hernia. In most cases, GERD can be relieved through diet and lifestyle changes; however, some people may require medication or surgery.

  • Common signs and symptoms of GERD include:
    A burning sensation in your chest (heartburn), usually after eating, which might be worse at night.
    Chest pain.
    Difficulty swallowing.
    Regurgitation of food or sour liquid.
    Sensation of a lump in your throat.

Popular over-the-counter medications like Tums, Maalox, Rolaids and Mylanta neutralize stomach acid and provide fast-acting relief in mild or isolated cases of acid reflux. Some antacids come in liquid form to coat the lining of the esophagus and help reduce the amount of acid in the stomach.

If left untreated, chronic gastroesophageal reflux can cause complications such as esophagitis, esophageal ulcers, bleeding, or scarring of the esophagus. Laparoscopic antireflux surgery (also called Nissen fundoplication) is used in the treatment of GERD when medicines are not successful.

APPENDICITIS: SYMPTOMS AND TREATMENT

APPENDICITIS: SYMPTOMS AND TREATMENT

appendicitisComplaints of a pain in the side will almost always bring the suggestion, “Maybe it’s appendicitis!” It’s true that pain is one of the symptoms, but what is appendicitis, and how do you know if you really might be having an attack? If you are suffering from appendicitis, what is the treatment?

Let’s start by looking at what the organ known as the appendix does. The human appendix is a finger-shaped pouch that projects from the colon on the lower right side of the abdomen. Previously thought to have no redeeming functions, new research shows that the appendix seems to play a part in immune functions and digestion, and it is especially important during fetal development through the third decade of life.

When this small organ becomes inflamed and filled with pus, it is called appendicitis. This is thought to be caused by infection that finds its way into the organ or perhaps from a blockage containing bacteria that causes infection.

Regardless of the cause, appendicitis usually presents itself as pain near the navel, moving to the lower right side and becoming severe. The pain is often made worse by coughing or other body-jarring movements. Sometimes accompanied by nausea and vomiting, fever, loss of appetite, constipation or diarrhea, and abdominal bloating, appendicitis can be quite painful and serious.  If not treated promptly, the appendix can even rupture, leading to serious issues.

Typically, surgery to remove the appendix (appendectomy) along with antibiotics for infection is the preferred treatment for appendicitis. Appendectomy can be performed as open surgery requiring a relatively large incision or laparoscopically with a few very small abdominal incisions. In general, laparoscopic surgery takes less recovery time with less pain and scarring, but each case is unique.

Schedule an appointment with Dr. Johnson to discuss surgical options.

ACUTE CARE SURGERY

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As medicine changes and modernizes, new specialties arise. General surgery is seeing new fields emerge. One is acute care surgery. Acute care surgery is an evolving specialty with three essential components – trauma, critical care, and emergency surgery.  Acute care surgeons provide multidisciplinary care for patients who require emergency surgery because of an accident or sudden illness. This care continues throughout the patient’s hospitalization and following discharge.

These changes in surgery are in response to a number of forces. General surgeons are becoming increasingly more focused, especially in areas such as advanced laparoscopic surgery, bariatric (obesity) surgery, endovascular surgery, and breast surgery. With these areas of concentration, come less interest in being on call for emergencies (especially during “off” hours), which can interfere with other, non-emergency cases and office practice. In addition, many trauma surgeons wish to increase their operative case load because trauma care itself has become less involved with operative procedures.

As this specialty has grown, acute surgical emergencies often represent the most common reason for hospital admission. These conditions include, but are not limited to: acute appendicitis, cholecystitis or gallbladder disease, diverticulitis, pancreatitis, intestinal obstruction, intestinal ischemia, intra-abdominal sepsis, incarcerated hernias and perforated viscous.

Acute care surgery integrates the long-established field of trauma surgery with the management of general surgical emergencies. Traditionally, management of non-traumatic emergency conditions requiring surgery has been entrusted to both general surgeons and surgical subspecialists, depending on the supply and availability of these surgeons in each hospital, but as stated above, many surgeons are reluctant to take on-call responsibilities.

Dr. Matthew Johnson is board-certified in acute care surgery, general surgery, and critical care, as well as being a board-certified robotic surgeon. After completing his residency in general surgery, he then went on to become one of the early fellows in the country to complete an acute care surgery fellowship at the University of Nevada School of Medicine.

Women & Gallstones

Did you know that women are at increased risk for gallstones

Gallstones occur in up to 20% of American women by the age of 60. Women between the ages of 20 and 60 years are three times more likely to develop gallstones than men.

Risk Factors for Development of Gallstones

  • Multiple pregnancies
  • Family history of gallstones
  • Hispanic or American Indian heritage
  • Obesity
  • Rapid loss of weightgallstones_symptomspic

ASPIRIN MAY HELP WARD OFF GASTRIC CANCERS

DrJohnson

A new study suggests that taking aspirin regularly over several years may help prevent gastrointestinal cancers. The results of the study were presented recently at an American Association for Cancer Research meeting in Philadelphia.

Although results of the study showed a 20% lower risk of cancers of the gastrointestinal tract, especially in the colon and rectum, among people taking aspirin, the lead researcher, Yin Cao, a postdoctoral research fellow at the Harvard School of Public Health in Boston, doesn’t think people should start taking aspirin to prevent cancer until more research is done. In addition, patients and their doctors need to consider the potential risks of taking aspirin, including stomach bleeding. Still, the researcher indicated that the data suggest that along with the benefits of aspirin in the prevention of heart attacks and strokes, long-term regular aspirin use may have even more significant health benefits than known before.

The benefit of aspirin in reducing overall cancer risk appeared to depend on how much one took. The more aspirin taken, the more the risk was reduced. Amounts ranged from less than one aspirin a week to 15 or more, the researchers said. Getting the biggest benefit from aspirin required taking it for at least 16 years. The benefit was no longer seen within four years of stopping it, the researchers found. According to the study authors, the association of aspirin with reduced cancer risk was the same for women and men regardless of race, history of diabetes, family history of cancer, weight, smoking, regular use of other painkillers, or taking multivitamins.

Although aspirin is recommended for most people who have had a heart attack and has some benefits for cancer risk as well, at this point the American Cancer Society does not recommend that people use aspirin specifically to prevent cancer because it is not clear that the benefits with respect to cancer outweigh the risks. While not common, aspirin can cause serious, even occasionally fatal, stomach bleeding, even at low doses.

Common GI Conditions

Common GI Conditions

Worst Foods for Digestion

dairy_products_1From Medicine Net & Web MD

Dairy Products

What is a Dairy Product:

Dairy products, milk and any of the foods made from milk, including butter, cheese, ice cream, yogurt, and condensed and dried milk.

If they trigger diarrhea, bloating, and gas, you may be “lactose intolerant.” It means you don’t have an enzyme that digests a sugar in milk and other forms of dairy. Or, you may have a sensitivity to the protein in mild and milk products.

Ingredients With Milk

If you see these listed on a label, the food has milk proteins in it:

  • Artificial butter or cheese flavor
  • Casein or caseinates
  • Curd
  • Ghee
  • Hydrolysates
  • Lactalbumin, lactalbumin phosphate
  • Lactose, lactoglobulin, lactoferrin, lactulose
  • Rennet
  • Whey or whey products

Tips for Living Well With a Milk Allergy

  • Find other ways to get vitamins and minerals. Dairy products are an important source of calcium, protein, and vitamins D and B12. If you or your child has a milk allergy, foods such as broccoli, spinach, and soy products can help fill the void. A registered dietitian can help you develop a well-balanced eating plan.
  • Try dairy substitutes. Drink soy, rice, and almond milk that are fortified with calcium and vitamin D. Look for non-dairy ice cream, chocolate, cheese, and yogurt.
  • Be careful with kosher products. Some may contain milk protein, even those labeled “pareve,” which are considered milk-free under kosher guidelines.
  • Ask your pediatrician about safe formula. If you have a baby with a milk allergy, the doctor may suggest an extensively hydrolyzed, casein-based formula.
  • Avoid milk outside the kitchen. Check labels on cosmetics, creams, and ointments to see if they contain cow’s milk in any form. Some medicines also contain whey, which is made from milk.

WHAT IS ACUTE CARE SURGERY?

download

Acute care surgery is an evolving specialty with three essential components – trauma, critical care, and emergency surgery.  Acute care surgeons provide multidisciplinary care for patients who require emergency surgery because of an accident or sudden illness. This care continues throughout the patient’s hospitalization and following discharge.

These changes in surgery are in response to a number of forces. General surgeons are becoming increasingly more focused, especially in areas such as advanced laparoscopic surgery, bariatric (obesity) surgery, endovascular surgery, and breast surgery. With these areas of concentration, come less interest in being on call for emergencies (especially during “off” hours), which can interfere with other, non-emergency cases and office practice. In addition, many trauma surgeons wish to increase their operative case load because trauma care itself has become less involved with operative procedures.

As this specialty has grown, acute surgical emergencies often represent the most common reason for hospital admission. These conditions include, but are not limited to: acute appendicitis, cholecystitis or gallbladder disease, diverticulitis, pancreatitis, intestinal obstruction, intestinal ischemia, intra-abdominal sepsis, incarcerated hernias and perforated viscous.

Acute care surgery integrates the long-established field of trauma surgery with the management of general surgical emergencies. Traditionally, management of non-traumatic emergency conditions requiring surgery has been entrusted to both general surgeons and surgical subspecialists, depending on the supply and availability of these surgeons in each hospital, but as stated above, many surgeons are reluctant to take on-call responsibilities.

Dr. Matthew Johnson is board-certified in acute care surgery, general surgery, and critical care, as well as being a board-certified robotic surgeon. After completing his residency in general surgery, he then went on to become one of the early fellows in the country to complete an acute care surgery fellowship at the University of Nevada School of Medicine.

Appendicitis

appendicitis_s2_inflammation_illustration

Appendicitis begins with pain near the belly button and then moves to the right side. This is often accompanied by nausea, vomiting, poor appetite, fever, and chills.
People may experience:
Pain areas: in the mid-abdomen or right lower abdomen
Pain types: can be dull, sharp, mild, or severe
Whole body: chills, fever, loss of appetite, or malaise
Gastrointestinal: diarrhea, nausea, or vomiting
Also common: abdominal pain migration or abdominal tenderness
Critical: consult a doctor for medical advice