Month: November 2017

What are the most common gastrointestinal disorders?

22406533_1471857329536092_8What are the most common gastrointestinal disorders?

Acid Reflux, Heartburn, GERD.
Dyspepsia/Indigestion.
Nausea and Vomiting.
Peptic Ulcer Disease.
Abdominal Pain Syndrome.
Belching, Bloating, Flatulence.
Biliary Tract Disorders, Gallbladder Disorders and Gallstone Pancreatitis.
Gallstone Pancreatitis

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Matthew Johnson MD Robotic Surgeon, GI General Surgeon, Trauma & Critical Care Surgeon Offers Three Locations in the Las Vegas Area.

MATTHEW JOHNSON, MD Trauma Surgeon, General Surgeon &
Critical Care Surgeon
Dr. Matthew Johnson is a very compassionate surgeon that always takes extra time when communicating with his patients as well as their families regarding their care. He is driven, kind, and extremely innovative in the field of surgery. He is also one of the few surgical endoscopists in the country. In 2011, as a chief resident, he received the Professionalism Award at the University of Nevada School of Medicine and continues to emphasize this professionalism throughout his surgical practice. He is very well respected by his colleagues in the field and always strives for perfection.

Dr. Johnson did his undergraduate training at the University of Texas at Austin and is a faithful Texas Longhorn to this day. He subsequently attained his Medical Doctorate at the American University of the Caribbean, in St. Maarten, N.A. where he also attained a Masters in Medical Science (M.M.S.). Dr. Johnson’s residency training was completed at the University of Nevada School of Medicine, Las Vegas, NV in General Surgery (2005-11).

He then went on to become one of the early fellows in the country to complete an Acute Care Surgery fellowship at the University of Nevada School of Medicine, Las Vegas, NV (2011-13). During his residency and fellowship, Dr. Johnson also trained in Surgical Endoscopy with a specific emphasis on both diagnostic & therapeutic ERCP. In fact, along with other colleagues, he developed a new method for treating obstructing complicated biliary disease using combined cholecystectomy and ERCP in a one stage procedure, so-called the “One-Step/ELBS”. Throughout residency and fellowship, Dr. Johnson presented at many national conferences regarding ERCP use by surgeons for trauma and general surgery in addition to authoring several publications.
Following post-graduate training, Dr. Johnson joined Desert Surgical Associates and hit the ground running. He cares for patients in the field of general surgery, minimally invasive surgery, trauma, and critical care. Dr. Johnson’s specific interests involve minimally invasive robotic surgery, advancement of minimally invasive surgery in trauma patients, foregut surgery, hepatobiliary surgery and the use of ERCP for both diagnostic and therapeutic measures.

Patients can schedule and appointments with Dr Johnson at three locations in Las Vegas by calling 702-369-7052

Central: Maryland Parkway at Sunrise Hospital, North Tenaya, across from Mountain View Hospital and in Henderson.

 

 

Matthew Johnon, MD Vegas Robot Doc GI Surgeon, Trauma Surgeon, Critical Care Surgeon

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Matthew Johnson, MD is a team member at Desert Surgical Associates (DSA).

Dr Johnson performs GI, trauma and critical care surgeries.

Gastrointestinal (GI) diseases refer to diseases involving the gastrointestinal tract, namely the esophagus, stomach, small intestine, large intestine and rectum, and the accessory organs of digestion, the liver, gallbladder, and pancreas.

Gallstones

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The best test for gallstones is an ultrasound. It’s quick and safe and gives us a lot of information about how the gallbladder looks, and it has pretty high accuracy. The ultrasound tech will be able to see gallstones or gallbladder irritation, such as a thickened wall or fluid around the gallbladder.

Some patients may be referred for a second kind of test called an HIDA (hepatobiliary) scan, in which a radioactive chemical is injected into your arm and the tech watches what happens when it reaches your gallbladder. Generally, HIDA scans are only performed on patients who have other underlying conditions or who have gallbladder pain symptoms, but no stones on an ultrasound.

Escaped stones could lead to jaundice or pancreatitis and require surgery.

If it’s not causing symptoms, or if you pass it as a few lucky people do, nothing. But if they are causing trouble,the gallbladder may need to be removed. If the person is experiencing pain, called biliary colic, or develops a gallbladder infection, called cholecystitis, gallbladder surgery is probably needed.

If the stones get outside your gallbladder and travel down the duct, they can cause some pretty serious complications, so it’s important to have them taken care of if you’re having a problem.

Escaped stones can cause obstructions in the ducts that lead to jaundice or pancreatitis, Any of these symptoms would require gallbladder surgery, called cholecystectomy.

Gallbladder removal surgery is usually an outpatient procedure, with a short recovery time and for most people,no long-lasting effects.