Month: May 2019

HEMORRHOIDS

 

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HEMORRHOIDS
Hemorrhoids are not life-threatening, but they can make life miserable for some people.

Internal and External Hemorrhoids

Internal hemorrhoids are far enough inside the rectum that you can’t usually see or feel them. They don’t generally hurt because you have few pain-sensing nerves there. Bleeding may be the only sign of them.

External hemorrhoids are under the skin around the anus, where there are many more pain-sensing nerves, so they tend to hurt as well as bleed.

While most hemorrhoids occur on the outside of the anus and are fairly easy to treat, internal hemorrhoids can be more challenging.

GI SURGEONS can treat internal hemorrhoids.

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All About Your Microbiome

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What Is It?

Did you know your body is home to trillions of tiny organisms called microbes? No worries — those “bugs” are supposed to be there! Together, they make up your microbiome. It’s all over your body but mainly in your gut. Your microbiome is closely tied to your health in ways you might not expect. And researchers are studying how it might improve health from head to toe.

Your gut and your brain talk back and forth to each other, connecting through millions of nerve cells. Scientists have linked certain changes in the gut microbiome to stress, depression, and anxiety.

Inflammatory bowel disease is a group of conditions that cause your intestines to become inflamed. They include Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis. The way your gut microbes affect the cells that line your intestines may play a role in these diseases. Certain types of bacteria may irritate the intestines. Some people with Crohn’s disease have a gene glitch that lets gut bacteria enter the intestine’s walls. This can trigger inflammation.

Scientists are looking for ways to improve the microbiome to help people avoid certain diseases or respond to treatments better. But some medicines can harm it.  One round of antibiotics can change your microbiome for up to a year. (Antibiotics don’t just kill the bacteria that make you sick. They also kill your helpful gut bacteria.) And a study of more than 1,000 drugs showed that 1 in 4 affected bacteria growth. These included blood pressure, cancer, and diabetes medications.

Simple daily habits make a difference. What you eat can change the microbes that live in your body. High-fiber foods (such as veggies, whole grains, and fruit) feed the helpful bacteria in your colon. They also discourage the growth of some harmful ones. Probiotic foods, such as yogurt and pickled vegetables, also deliver helpful bacteria to your gut. Getting enough sleep, easing stress, and exercising may also improve your microbiome.

From WebMD

APPENDICITIS: SYMPTOMS AND TREATMENT

APPENDICITIS: SYMPTOMS AND TREATMENT

appendicitisComplaints of a pain in the side will almost always bring the suggestion, “Maybe it’s appendicitis!” It’s true that pain is one of the symptoms, but what is appendicitis, and how do you know if you really might be having an attack? If you are suffering from appendicitis, what is the treatment?

Let’s start by looking at what the organ known as the appendix does. The human appendix is a finger-shaped pouch that projects from the colon on the lower right side of the abdomen. Previously thought to have no redeeming functions, new research shows that the appendix seems to play a part in immune functions and digestion, and it is especially important during fetal development through the third decade of life.

When this small organ becomes inflamed and filled with pus, it is called appendicitis. This is thought to be caused by infection that finds its way into the organ or perhaps from a blockage containing bacteria that causes infection.

Regardless of the cause, appendicitis usually presents itself as pain near the navel, moving to the lower right side and becoming severe. The pain is often made worse by coughing or other body-jarring movements. Sometimes accompanied by nausea and vomiting, fever, loss of appetite, constipation or diarrhea, and abdominal bloating, appendicitis can be quite painful and serious.  If not treated promptly, the appendix can even rupture, leading to serious issues.

Typically, surgery to remove the appendix (appendectomy) along with antibiotics for infection is the preferred treatment for appendicitis. Appendectomy can be performed as open surgery requiring a relatively large incision or laparoscopically with a few very small abdominal incisions. In general, laparoscopic surgery takes less recovery time with less pain and scarring, but each case is unique.

Schedule an appointment with Dr. Johnson to discuss surgical options.

Read more about appendicitis at: http://www.appendicitissymptoms.org/diagnosis-and-treatment